Ta-Nehisi Coates Right And Wrong About The First White President Trump.

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The prolific voice of a generation Ta-Nehisi Coates has penned a new essay The First White President which gives a brilliant explanation of how contrary to all logic Donald Trump was elected President of the United States. Coates is right about how racism played a part in electing Trump but he is wrong that racism is the sole reason Trump was elected.

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Ta-Nehisi Coates (left) and President Donald Trump (right).

The main thesis of Coates essay is that his whiteness and racism not economics was the reason that Donald Trump was elected President.

According to the essay:

“Asserting that Trump’s rise was primarily powered by cultural resentment and economic reversal has become de rigueur among white pundits and thought leaders. But evidence for this is, at best, mixed. In a study of preelection polling data, the Gallup researchers Jonathan Rothwell and Pablo Diego-Rosell found that “people living in areas with diminished economic opportunity” were “somewhat more likely to support Trump.” But the researchers also found that voters in their study who supported Trump generally had a higher mean household income ($81,898) than those who did not ($77,046).

Those who approved of Trump were “less likely to be unemployed and less likely to be employed part-time” than those who did not. They also tended to be from areas that were very white: “The racial and ethnic isolation of whites at the zip code level is one of the strongest predictors of Trump support.” An analysis of exit polls conducted during the presidential primaries estimated the median household income of Trump supporters to be about $72,000. But even this lower number is almost double the median household income of African Americans, and $15,000 above the American median.

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Trump’s white support was not determined by income. According to Edison Research, Trump won whites making less than $50,000 by 20 points, whites making $50,000 to $99,999 by 28 points, and whites making $100,000 or more by 14 points. This shows that Trump assembled a broad white coalition that ran the gamut from Joe the Dishwasher to Joe the Plumber to Joe the Banker. So when white pundits cast the elevation of Trump as the handiwork of an inscrutable white working class, they are being too modest, declining to claim credit for their own economic class.

Trump’s dominance among whites across class lines is of a piece with his larger dominance across nearly every white demographic. Trump won white women (+9) and white men (+31). He won white people with college degrees (+3) and white people without them (+37). He won whites ages 18–29 (+4), 30–44 (+17), 45–64 (+28), and 65 and older (+19). Trump won whites in midwestern Illinois (+11), whites in mid-Atlantic New Jersey (+12), and whites in the Sun Belt’s New Mexico (+5).

In no state that Edison polled did Trump’s white support dip below 40 percent. Hillary Clinton’s did, in states as disparate as Florida, Utah, Indiana, and Kentucky. From the beer track to the wine track, from soccer moms to nascar dads, Trump’s performance among whites was dominant. According to Mother Jones, based on preelection polling data, if you tallied the popular vote of only white America to derive 2016 electoral votes, Trump would have defeated Clinton 389 to 81, with the remaining 68 votes either a toss-up or unknown. By his sixth month in office, embroiled in scandal after scandal, a Pew Research Center poll found Trump’s approval rating underwater with every single demographic group. Every demographic group, that is, except one: people who identified as white.”

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Coates is correct Donald Trump united white Americans unlike no other presidential candidate, more than the Civil Rights backlash presidential campaign of Barry Goldwater and more than the “Come home, Reagan Democrats” presidential campaign of Ronald Reagan. But Coates assertion that the “bloody heirloom” of racism some five decades after Martin Luther King Jr. was gunned down on a Memphis balcony — even after a black president; indeed, strengthened by the fact of that black president — is to accept that racism remains, as it has since 1776, at the heart of this country’s political life fails to acknowledge……………click here to continue…………………………………

Written by

Isaac Newton Farris Jr. is the nephew of Martin Luther King, Jr. and serves as Senior Fellow at the King Center.

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